OSU PechaKucha

  • Start date
    2019. 05. 31. 17:00
  • End date
    2019. 05. 31. 18:00
  • Location
    Nagy Lajos király campus F203

The word “PechaKucha” means “chit chat” in Japanese, and this presentation format suggests just that: a little bit of talking and a lot of showing. Invented in Tokyo in 2003, PechaKucha encourages lively and rapid sharing of information and ideas, particularly through images. Since then PechaKucha Nights have been organized in over 1000 cities in the world, often by architects and designers.

Official guidelines read:
Pecha Kucha is an oral presentation format in which the speaker shows 20 slides for 20 seconds each. The total presentation is 6 minutes 40 seconds long. The slides advance automatically, and the speaker speaks along with the slides. The rigid format forces the speaker to be both creative and disciplined.

Our version:
Students will present in groups of three on topics that have intrigued them during their time in Central Europe. Research and personal observation underlie the projects. We are also inspired by cultural theorists: students have been flâneurs à la Walter Benjamin, “making [the world] strange” à la Viktor Shklovsky, and thinking about whether the “medium is the message,” à la Marshall McLuhan.

Presentations will mostly focus on Hungary, although reference may be made to Poland as well, since students spent one week there. The unusual twist is the group dynamic—we have practiced transitions and working together, but in a sense you will get three PechaKuchas for the price of one (or 21 for the price of 7)! We are using the PechaKucha format to highlight the incredibly visual experience of Hungarian history, culture, and life which we have had over the past month in Budapest.

We are delighted to have an audience. Please be gentle with us. We’ve practiced, but like many PechaKucha presenters, we are still amateurs with this format!

Order of Presentations:

  • Budapest Public Transit and Accessibility: Spencer, Hannah & Jeremy
  • Representation of Jewish Culture in Hungary: Jordan, Mac & Joel 
  • Cultural Tips for Travelers to Budapest: Libby, Becca & Shelby
  • Modern Propaganda in Hungarian Culture and Politics: Taylor, Maura & Mackenzie
  • Budapest Ruin Bars: Sarah, Liz & Katie
  • Gentrification in Budapest: Jake, Alyssa & Patrick
  • Budapest as a Resort: Gardens and Thermal Baths: Byranna, Mallory & Isabella